Review of the Bowflex Sport Home Gym

bowflex sport home gym

You can do 66 exercises with just one machine. This is the promise of the Bowflex Sport Home Gym, and since its launch more than 10 years ago, this promise is still being kept even to this day. It is a testament to the Bowflex quality and durability that people today are still interested in the Bowflex Sport even after a decade of new technology and advancements.

 

66 Exercises With The Bowflex Sport Home Gym

This isn’t a ballpark figure or an exaggeration. All of these 66 exercises are listed in the manual that comes with the purchase. These exercises are accompanied by nicely written descriptions of what to do, along with pictures as well. They are mostly either for strength training or for cardio workouts.

  • 8 chest exercises. These include Shoulder Horizontal Adduction, variations of the bench press and chess fly, and the lying cable crossover.
  • 14 shoulder exercises. You can do rear deltoid rows, shoulder raises, rotator cuffs, and scapular protraction, retraction, and depression.
  • 9 back exercises. These include bent over rows, lat pulldowns, lat rows, and low back extension.
  • 16 arm exercises. That’s quite a lot of arm work, but then again it’s a very popular part to focus on. Here you’ve got several triceps extension versions, biceps curls, and wrist curls.
  • 5 abdominal exercises. There’s the trunk rotation and of course several types of crunches.
  • 13 leg exercises. Here you’ve got the squat; leg extensions, curl, and press; ankle inversion and eversion; hip extensions, abductions, and adductions.

All these should suffice even for experienced fitness buffs, especially if your main purpose is to just be stronger and fitter. For beginners they may even be a bit intimidating. You’d really have to be a serious competitive bodybuilder if 66 exercises aren’t enough. (For those folks, Bowflex hasn’t ignored your needs. The company also offers home gyms that allow you to do more than 90 types of exercises.)

 

Additional Features of  The Bowflex Sport Home Gym

The resistance of the Sport comes from Power Rods, which is better than free weights because there’s no risk of joint pain or inertia. You can lift a measly 5 pounds to the 210-pound maximum, and you even have the option of upgrading to up to 410 pounds.

You’ll need a work area that’s 100 inches by 80 inches, but you can fold the unit into a more compact 52 inches by 38 inches for storage. There’s even a set of transport wheels.

 

Pros

Have we mentioned the 66 exercises? What these exercises means is that for the most part there’s really no good reason at all for you to get out of your comfortable home to go to a gym. Think about that for a moment. You save time, effort and money for transportation, and you also save a lot on gym fees. You also no longer need to wait for a machine to be free before you can work out on it. It’s all right here.

This is a great investment because Bowflex really did make sure that these things will last for a very long while. And this has been proven. The Sport has been around for a decade, and even though it has been discontinued a lot of units still work flawlessly.

The setup is also quite astonishingly “easy”. Of course this is all relative, but if you have tried outing together one of the other home gyms then you’d really appreciate how easier the Sport is to put together. While the need for about three hours can truly be annoying, that doesn’t compare to the 7 to 12 hours of work you’d need for other models.

Finally, the option to fold it up and store somewhere out of the way may be appreciated by some folks. After all, no matter how good it looks, the Sport may not always go with the theme of your décor.

 

Cons

First of all, let’s all admit that the assembly is a true pain in the glutes. While it is true that putting the Bowflex Sport Home Gym  together is actually even much simpler compared to other models, that doesn’t mean that it will be easy or that it will take a fairly short time. There are really a lot of parts to keep track of, and the instructions aren’t always clear for everyone. It does make you wish that the purchase included a DVD instruction manual, so that you really have a clear idea of how to go about assembling the equipment.

And since we’re on the topic of DVDs, there are also non DVDs for the exercises. And good luck to you looking for those online. While you can Google each specific exercise listed on the manual to see how the movements go, you won’t necessarily find a video which uses the Bowflex Sport Home Gym for the exercise, and that’s what you actually need.

Finally, for all the talk about how you can fold it and transport it to a storage closet, the fact is that sooner or later you simply will just refuse to do it. It’s just so bothersome, especially if you use it every day.  And there will always be the risk that you will put it in a closet and it will stay there forever. That’s because the thought of pulling it out and setting it up is already tiresome even when you’re just thinking about it. Once you set it up to work, do yourself a favor and let it stay there even after you’re done.

 

Conclusion

If you find a negative Bowflex Sport review (and they’re rare compared to the vast number of glowing reviews), often the fault isn’t really in the unit itself. The manual isn’t really perfect, and some folks may have some difficulty trying to do specific exercises. But for your money, this is a bargain and an investment that can bring a lot in return.

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